ĿͥǡΡȸŪΤɤѤǹˡˡ ܿͤƻоݤȤʤ̡֥ѡ㡼ˡפ롪

2016.12.11

ơβͤ˵ĤʤָۡưμͳפȤμͳƻ뤵졢¤̤褬äƤ뤫⤷ʤޤǡ硼뤬1984١ܸǡϥ䥫epiʸˡˤǥȥԥμ¸ǽˤ褦ʡˡƤꥹDzķ褵줿

ꥹǵˤξƻˡƤķ褵

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ѡIndependent׻ΥݡȤˤȡ̾Ρ̡֥ѡ㡼ˡʤΤϡˡפȸƤФ롢󥿡ͥåȾΤ٤̿εϿ򥵡ӥץХ1ǯݴɤɬפ˱ɤ˸ʤФʤʤȤȤǤʤˡƤIJ̲ᤷķ褵줿ȤΤȤǤ롣꽢Ǥ餳ˡƤ򶯤䤷Ƥᥤ꤬ޤ򲡤ڤǤΩȤʤä褦Ǥ롣

ˡƤγפϡ󥿡ͥåȡӥץХòҤʤɤΥ󥿡ͥåȴϢȼԤϡ桼̿ǡ1ǯݴɤŹ沽줿̿Ϥʣ粽ʤƤϤʤʤȤΤǤ롣

ݴɤ줿ǡФơθŪؤϡȽ꤫ܺʤ˥ǽˤʤФʤʤΤǡٻʤɤȺܺؤ䡢ƥкΤθµؤΤߤǤϤʤ̳Ϣؤ䡢ɴϢء˿ʰ˴Ϣ뵡ؤ˻ޤǤȡξ¤˹ΤǤȤ

̣Ūؤ˾СθĿͤ̿򤹤٤ƴˤ뤳ȤǽˤʤˡΧǤ롣Ŀ;ݸɤäǤϤʤοաĿͤΥץ饤ХΤŪʤ褦ʤΤǤ롣

2013ǯ˸CIAɰΥɥɡΡǥ󤬡ꥫθŪؤˤ̿˵䡢¾ŤᤤޤޤʸĿͳưİ˵ƻξ餫ˤοᤰäƤŪˤޤȯŸϵ˿ȻפͤƤߤСʤȤ⺣ޤǤäĵưϿ̲̩΢˹ԤƤˡƤˤäơ򿶤äƹԤȤǤ褦ˤʤäȤȤǤ롣

ܤˤȤäдߤβлǤϤʤ

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ˡƲķϥ󥿡ͥåȤȯưλɤ˾嵩˸ĿθŪʤΤǤ롣˹ͤʤФʤʤȤϡˡƤķ褷ΤꥹǤȤȤǤ롣

ϤȺĹȤ䡢Ū԰ʹȤäԤäΤǤϤʤ͸ºṮ̌ʹǤ륤ꥹǤνǤꡢλĹŪʱƶϤ礭Ȼפ롣

桹ˤȤäƤ⡢ǤдߤβлǤϤʤʤäƤ롣̿ȯܤǤäƤ⡢̿褬ꥹǤä顢ϴƻоݤǤȤȤǤ롣ꥹ˽ͧãȥ᡼ΤȤԤäǡ䡢ꥹδȤȤΥӥͥ̿ʤɤΥǡ⡢٤ƥץХˤäƵϿĤƤȤȤˤʤ롣ܿͤǤȡʤ˿ͤǤȡꥹ߽ԤȤΥߥ˥ˤդɬޤƤȤ⤤ΤǤϤʤ

ȿҲŪʳưԤäƤʤ¤ꡢ̿򸫤ƤʤοۤϤʤȤͤ⤤뤬ǤϤʤϤ修ϻ修ǤäơΤǽȤȼΡɤΤǤϤʤĶƻҲؤȤʤ꤫ͤʤ衢ˡƤαѼΤ԰ǤǤäѤǤ롣EUΥæη꤫ꥹ줫衢ɤ˸äƿʤǤȤΤƤ뤷ʤȤСޤˤɤ

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͡Independentסۤ

ȸ TOCANA


The Snooper's Charter passed into law this week – say goodbye to your privacy

The fact that youre on this website is – potentially – state knowledge. Service providers must now store details of everything you do online for 12 months – and make it accessible to dozens of public authorities

mobile-device-security

The Investigatory Powers Act this week quietly passed into law Getty Images/iStockphoto This week a law was passed that silently rips privacy from the modern world. Its called the Investigatory Powers Act.

Under the guise of counter-terrorism, the British state has achieved totalitarian-style surveillance powers – the most intrusive system of any democracy in history. It now has the ability to indiscriminately hack, intercept, record, and monitor the communications and internet use of the entire population.

The hundreds of chilling mass surveillance programmes revealed by Edward Snowden in 2013 were – we assumed – the result of a failure of the democratic process. Snowdens bravery finally gave Parliament and the public the opportunity to scrutinise this industrial-scale spying and bring the state back into check.

But, in an environment of devastatingly poor political opposition, the Government has actually extended state spying powers beyond those exposed by Snowden – setting a world-leading precedent.

The fact that youre on this website is – potentially – state knowledge. Service providers must now store details of everything you do online for 12 months – and make it accessible to dozens of public authorities.



What does your web history look like? Does it reveal your political interests? Social networks? Religious ideas? Medical concerns? Sexual interests? Pattern of life?

What might the last year of your internet use reveal?

Government agencies have even won powers to hack millions of computers, phones and tablets en masse, leaving them vulnerable to further criminal attacks.

You might think that you have nothing to hide, and therefore nothing to fear. In that case, you may as well post your email and social media login details in the comments below.

But I dont think we do feel that blase about our privacy – we cherish our civil liberties. Everyone has a stake in guarding our democracy, protecting minorities from suspicionless surveillance, defending protest rights, freedom of the press, and enjoying the freedom to explore and express oneself online. These freedoms allow our thoughts, opinions and personalities to flourish and develop – they are the very core of democracy.

Has any country in history given itself such extensive surveillance powers and remained a rights-respecting democracy? We need not look too far back – or overseas to see the risks of unbridled surveillance. In recent years, the British state has spied on law-abiding environmental activists, democratically elected politicians, victims of torture and police brutality, and hundreds of journalists.

In fact, as the Bill finally passed on Wednesday evening, I was training a group of British and American journalists in how to protect themselves from state surveillance – not just from Russia or Syria, but from their own countries.

When Edward Snowden courageously blew the whistle on mass surveillance he warned that, armed with such tools, a new leader might say that because of the crisis, because of the dangers we face in the world, some new and unpredicted threat, we need more authority, we need more power. And there will be nothing the people can do at that point to oppose it.

The US finds itself with a President-elect who has committed to monitoring all mosques, banning all Muslims, investigating Black Lives Matter activists and deporting two to three million people. And with the ushering into law of the UK-US free trade in mass surveillance, MPs may have a lot to answer for.

Liberty and its members fought tooth and nail against this new law from its inception to the moment it was passed. That fight is not yet over. Our message to Government: see you in court.

Silkie Carlo is the policy officer at Liberty

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